New Trends in Plastic Surgery Maryland Medical Professionals Are Watching

Maryland Plastic Surgeon serving Washington DC, & Virginia including Alexandria and Fairfax.

 

With plastic surgery, Maryland patients tend to follow national economic trends. When the economy is doing well, surgery numbers are up. When it declines, so does the number of people who are choosing surgery. While not necessarily a perfect economic indicator, trends in cosmetic surgery can be very relevant to trends in the economy.

In 2009, plastic surgery numbers saw a big drop. In 2010 the numbers increased, and in 2011 increased yet again to 1.6 million surgeries performed. The reason for these increases includes a boost in consumer confidence, as indicated by higher auto sales and a rebounding stock market.

Interestingly, even while the economy was rebounding the types of procedures that people chose were different. No longer were patients opting for just big-ticket plastic surgery. Maryland patients and those in other parts of the country were instead often opting for non-surgical options like BOTOX or other fillers and microdermabrasion. Still, cosmetic surgeons welcomed the business regardless of the type. In 2011, patients had 12.2 million non-surgical procedures done, with BOTOX and similar anti-wrinkle injections being the most popular.

Another interesting trend in the world of cosmetic surgery is the increasing impact of social media. Today's patients are turning to Twitter, Facebook, and other social media sites for information about procedures and their options for treating cosmetic issues. They also are using online tools to check the credentials of potential doctors and to research the effectiveness of procedures.

With the help of the Internet, patients are more informed than ever before when it comes to their options for plastic surgery. Maryland surgeons are embracing this trend and utilizing social media platforms to get the word out about their procedures. Typically, a well-informed patient is the best patient for cosmetic surgery.